GRE Snacks 17 – Eliminating bad answers in the GRE reading comprehension section

Tyler York
GRE Snacks

Eliminating bad answers is key throughout the GRE, but it can be tricky for the reading comprehension section. Luckily, Orion has three tried-and-true, clever tactics that help you immediately identify wrong answers for reading comp problems. Learn all three on this episode of our podcast.

If you’re looking for a comprehensive course to maximize your score on the GRE exam, check out Achievable’s GRE course that was authored by Orion.

GRE Snacks 17 – Eliminating bad answers in the GRE reading comprehension section

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 Welcome to GRE snacks, snackin will episodes that the GRE exam and graduate school edition. I'm Tyler, founder of achievable course. And as a reminder, you can check out our course. Achievable. Me and the code podcast will get you 10% off at checkout. Now, let's get started.
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 So today we're going to talk about eliminating bad answers and reading comprehension and you you wanted to specifically, talk about reading comprehension for this one cuz you kind of let me know the meaning bad interest. I think it's a pretty common just taking tip, but I'm curious how you apply that specifically to the section strategies that students can use that are specific to this question type on the verbal section. There's so much easier to spot them. Say eliminating answer choices on the quantitative section, sometimes it's hard to. Look at a question and know that certain numbers are totally absurd or irrelevant usually have to get pretty far along in the solution before you can determine that certain numbers or certain expressions. Are just not going to be the correct answer whereas on the reading. You can kind of tell that a gram since that's what we're going to be talking about today.
 80.6s
 Great. Yes. I mean take us away then it's like, is the answer 153 or 4-3? Or 15 R3. It's pretty hard to know what like if any of them, you can write off immediately but I think, yeah, I'm curious. What do you look for in Reading comp to write things off? Yeah, you're going to like these. There they're actually pretty fun. So, if you read the achievable manual, you would know that we recommend reading the passage first, so that you can get a gist understanding of the text. And that, of course, allows you to eliminate some of the answer choices that are just going to be bad, stupid or wrong. I mean, our students are intelligent. They comprehend. Most of the passage at the very least and so you're going to know that some of the answer choices are just kind of absurd, didn't read anything about that subject at all.
 140.6s
 Going to be easy to get rid of right to eliminate the choices, on the reading comprehension section of the test Beyond those, that are bad, stupid or wrong. I call these the three reading comprehension elimination strategies and we're going to go through them right now. You ready for this? Tyler number one contains a spoiler. So what is a spoiler? So in the context of the GRE a spoiler is a small word, it's usually an adjective or an adverb, some sort of modifier, It's a small world that makes an otherwise. Defensible answer choice to extreme and therefore wrong and it's sensible right. That's exactly why it makes the answer statement. The answer Choice wrong is because the statement becomes real.
 200.6s
 Fragile as a result, it's very hard to defend say a statement. Like all swans are white, right? You just need one, non white swan in the history of swan, dumb to disprove. The veracity of that statement show, spoilers are words like always never exclusively primarily solely. Mostly a lot of the words that really bother you when your partner uses them in an argument, like, you always do this, or I never do that is like, I don't know about that, right?
 237.3s
 Categorical statements as were absolute.
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 Exactly, they're really easy to discuss. Absolute are very easy to disprove. So some students use kind of extreme language to try to in an attempt to strengthen an argument. When in reality logically speaking, it makes the claims more susceptible to to being just proven best. A better choice is going to be more wishy-washy and vague. So contrast the statement all swans are white. For example, with the statement, most swans are somewhat whitish
 277.1s
 It's really hard to disprove that second statement. It doesn't tell you a lot of useful information but it's very very hard to disprove as a claim and that's what academic writing is all about. It's like the true. It is often, the less useful information, the statement contains so when in doubt you want the blandest Vegas, answer Choice. The most in the middle. The one that doesn't make a very strong stance when where the other. That's usually the hardest one to disprove and the most likely to be the credit response. All right so number one was actually really interesting. What? What is number two?
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 Yeah. Number to is is I think very very interesting as well as particular to the reading comp questions and I call it offensively. Now, I'm not talking about swear words, you're not going to see those on the GRE. What I do mean is that we live in a very politically correct. Litigious Society. So if an answer Choice taken out of context could be potentially offensive to some subgroup of humanity, it is definitely not going to be easy credit response here and have my son. Sure it would be like a public relations nightmare for ETS. The makers of the test. ETS thinks this thing is true about women or this thing is true about African-Americans. The keep in mind, doesn't even have to be about identified minority groups like those. I just mentioned he could be like a plumber's from Canada, you know, it could be educators.
 379.3s
 Humanity in advance of choice says that this group is a certain way or is not a certain way. That's a stereotype comment and it's not going to fly on the GRE. Keep in mind that even positive stereotypes are still stereotypes and potentially offensive to folks. So, right at the whole, the whole thing around like one account is, with my friends like that stereotype of who's better at math, who's better at basketball, right? Like, these are things that get you in trouble. There's a lot of stereotypes about specifically who's better at math so much so that they've changed a lot of the demographic submission process around standardized tests because of something called stereotype is actually do an episode about stereotype dies in the future. It's really
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 I think it's on it's in blank. It's a blank from the checkout like Malcolm Gladwell. So yes, even saying that a certain group is good at something is potentially offensive because pigeonholes that group of people in and identify a way, which doesn't always feel good to know people. Generally don't like to be labeled. Even if it's a positive labeled, it's confining and we're not going to see. Offensive language on hard-science pastures. It's, it's hard to get offended about quarks and fossils, but I guess people can still find a way. But it's, it's definitely more difficult than what they saw signs that so the passages are about literature or sociology, or politics or psychology and they're generally going to be about people and that's where the potentially offensive language comes into play. So I'm in Courage of inviting you as students to seek to be offended on the reading comprehension passages.
 499.3s
 The GRE. So, like be super sensitive are on the side of rejecting things. If it even comes close to making a claim about a certain group of people. Okay. Yeah. That's a good one. I mean, like it makes intuitive logical sense. Like you said, DTS doesn't want a PR nightmare but it's not something you would look for when you're like, looking at answer choices that you would think about it. Unless you would have heard this, these are these are strategies that don't have to do, with reading comprehension, for say, they have to do. With let's say, test-taking Saturn is, they have to do with the way, the test is constructed. And let's say the context in which the testing takes place, you know, American culture, graduate school admissions, things like that, which definitely informs me of the process.
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 Okay and number three, our third reading comprehension strategy is called copy and paste and copy and paste means kind of like what it sounds like, it means it means that something has been copied right out of the text and pasted directly into an answer Choice. Okay, so why is this a problem? So if a portion of the text is copyright out of the passage and paste into an answer choice, that is very unlikely to be the correct answer. And the reason for that is that if this were the correct answer, this would cease to be on some level of comprehension exam. It would just be an eye exam. I wouldn't even have to be able to read English to potentially get the answer correct. I can say these symbols in the text look like these symbols in the answer Choice. The same lines in the same order. So obviously it looks like there's some textual evidence for this answer Choice by Examining The Passage
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 I'm obviously that's a problem because we're not testing whether people's, you know, eyes work, they're testing whether they can comprehend
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 You know, textual evidence on a higher level. So the correct answer isn't going to look like the text, but it will mean the same thing as a text and pasted it won't be copy and pasted it but every word will kind of like be translated into a different version of itself. Sometimes I say it's like imagine they took the the citation in the text a Google translated into Swahili and then translated it back in English. So all the words are going to be different but it should more or less the same thing that's a really good option. For us means the same thing looks different. Now why is it became the way the copy and paste traps work? Is they generally use sticky words or phrases sticky words or phrases every day to remember it? You don't see, for example, the words nuclear regulation on a day-to-day basis,
 676.2s
 Going to remember that you read the words nucleus in regulation. And if you're running out of time, or if you're unsure about one of the two answer choices, you might choose the one that contains nuclear thermal regulation because you know, at least that you read something about that in the past. But most likely they will have changed one small word to make the choice deviated significantly in meaning from the text, which obviously limited. So there you have it. You going to read the passage, you're going to eliminate answers. Choices that are bad stupid and wrong based beyond comprehension and Daniel also, eliminate and stresses that contains spoilers potentially offensive language and copy and paste traps. Ideally, at that point, you only have one answer choice left, great shoes it and move on with your life. And if you have more than one and you can use a citation technique, which is something that we talked about in the achievable manual as well.
 729.4s
 Very good. Alright, thanks so much. Has been GRE snacks hosted by a Ryan from Stellar GRE and Tyler, from achievable, Shiva Bowl. And a Ryan have partnered to build a great, GRE course, you can try it for free. At achievable. Me and use the code podcast to get 10% off at checkout.
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